Tuesday, April 21. Local: Museo Iberê Camargo AM Session. 09:15-10:30 Suzana Herculano-Houzel UFRJ, Brazil Humans are special - aren't we? - PDF

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Sunday, April 19 Local: ASHCLIN, HCPA, 17:30-18:30 Meeting Registration 18:30-19:30 Reception 19:30-20:30 Diogo Souza, Opening ceremony 20:30-23:00 Entertainment Monday, April 20 Local: Museo Iberê Camargo

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Sunday, April 19 Local: ASHCLIN, HCPA, 17:30-18:30 Meeting Registration 18:30-19:30 Reception 19:30-20:30 Diogo Souza, Opening ceremony 20:30-23:00 Entertainment Monday, April 20 Local: Museo Iberê Camargo 09:00-09:15 Jorge Gross, HCPA, Opening remarks 09:15-10:30 Jeffrey Friedman Rockefeller University, USA A Tale of Two Hormones 10:30-10:45 Coffee break 10:45-12:00 Neltair Abreu Santiago Independent Artist/Cartoonist Creativity and creation in Arts 12:00-13:30 Lunch PM Session 13:30-14:45 Zoltan Molnar Oxford University, USA Evolution of brain development 14:45-16:00 Denis Burdakov The Francis Crick Institute, UK Brain coordination of instinctive drives 16:00-16:15 Coffee break 16:15 - Guided tour Iberê Camargo Museum Collection 18:00 - Happy hour Tuesday, April 21 Local: Museo Iberê Camargo 09:15-10:30 Suzana Herculano-Houzel UFRJ, Brazil Humans are special - aren't we? 10:30-10:45 Coffee break 10:45-12:00 Jeffrey Friedman Rockefeller University, USA Radio-wave control of feeding and glucose metabolism 12:00-13:45 Lunch PM Session 13:45-15:30 Students Presentation Session 1 (see details attached) Chair: Luis Portela, 15:30-15:45 Coffee break 15:45-17:00 Tamas Horvath Hypothalamic control of cannabinoid-induced feeding Wednesday, April 22 Local: FABICO, 09:15-10:30 Luc Pellerin Lausanne University, Switzerland Hunger games: from the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle to food intake regulation 10:30-10:45 Coffee break 10:45-12:00 Marcelo Dietrich Primitive circuits controlling behaviors 12:00-13:45 Lunch PM Session 13:45-15:30 Students Presentation Session 2 (see details attached) Chair: Diogo Souza, 15:30-15:45 Coffee break 15:45-17:00 Round of Discussion Session 1 Thursday, April 23 Local: FABICO, 09:00-10:45 Students Presentation Session 3 (see details attached) Chair: Adriano Assis, 10:45-11:00 Coffee break 11:00-12:15 Round of Discussion Session 2 12:15-12:30 Diogo Souza, Final remarks 12:30-14:00 Meeting wrap-up Evening Happy hour (Farewell party) Students presentation Introductory Lecture: Patricia P. Silveira, Assistant Professor in Pediatrics, Students: Jonatas de Paula Oliveira Undergraduate Student in Biological Sciences UENP Ribeirão do Pinhal, PR, Brazil Joselisa Peres Queiroz de Paiva Master Student in Neuroscience and Cognition UFABC Santo André, SP, Brazil Isabela Santos Valentim Master Student in Biological Chemistry UFRJ Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil Isabella Starling Alves Master Student in Neuroscience UFMG Belo Horizonte, BH, Brazil Beatriz Mizusaki PhD Student in Physics Session 1 Tuesday, April 21 13:45-15:30 Chair: Luis Portela, Session 2 Wednesday, April 22 13:45-15:30 Chair: Diogo Souza, Students: Bertha Cristina Bueno Bock Undergraduate Student in Psychology UCPel Pelotas, RS, Brazil Eduarda Demori Susin Master Student in Physics Claudia Angelica Bonilla Escobar Master Student in Neuroscience and Cognition UFABC Santo André, SP, Brazil Cristian Figueroa Master Student in Neuroscience Rafael de Oliveira Schneider PhD Student in Molecular and Cellular Biology Roberta de Paula Martins PhD Sstudent in Biochemistry UFSC Florianópolis, SC, Brazil Session 3 Thursday, April 23 09:00-10:45 Chair: Adriano Assis, Students: Gabriela Godoy Poluceno Undergraduate Student in Biological Sciences UFSC Florianópolis, SC, Brazil Yasmine Nonose Master Student in Biochemistry Gabriela Pandini Silote Master Student in Biochemistry and Pharmacology UFES Vitória, ES, Brazil Victor Daniel Vasquez Matsuda Master Student in Neuroscience and Behavior USP São Paulo, SP, Brazil Ana Paula Crestani PhD Student in Neuroscience Denny Marcel Seccon PhD Student in Biochemistry UFPR Curitiba, PR, Brazil Speakers Keynote Speaker: Jeffrey Friedman Rockefeller University, USA Radio-wave control of feeding and glucose metabolism Chemical and optical methods are in common usage for modulating neural activity and each approach has distinctive attributes. Optogenetics enables rapid regulation of cells but requires permanent implants and is most useful for activation in a small anatomic region due to the limited dispersion of light (approximately 1 mm). Chemically regulated activation using designer receptors can modulate dispersed cell populations but have slower kinetics. A tool for remote, rapid modulation of neural activity would provide a non-invasive alternative to optogenetics with faster temporal effects than chemical methods. Toward this end, we have developed a new method, NICR- noninvasive cell regulation- using radiowaves (RF) or magnetic fields (MF) to modulate neural activity. The system uses two components; ferritin and TRPV1. Targeted neurons express modified ferritin to generate iron oxide nanoparticles. Ferritin is tethered to TRPV1, a temperature sensitive, cation channel. RF and MF penetrate tissue resulting in heating/motion of the nanoparticle to gate the channel leading to gating of this cation channel and neural activation. In addition, point mutations of TRPV1 channel (TRPV1Mutant) alter its ion conductance from cations to chloride ions to allow non-invasive silencing of neurons. This method has been used to define neural circuits controlling glucose metabolism and food intake and a summary of these data will be presented. Neltair Abreu Santiago Independent Artist/Cartoonist, Brazil Creativity and creation in Arts Speakers Zoltan Molnar Oxford University, UK Evolution and brain development Comparative developmental studies of the mammalian brain identify key changes that might have generated the diverse structure and function of this organ. The radial and tangential enlargement of the cortex was driven by changes in the cortical neurogenesis, in particular the elaboration and cytoarchitectonic compartmentalization of the germinal zone, with alterations in the proportions of various progenitor types. Clonal analysis from selected progenitor populations started to reveal the lineage in various pallial sectors of the mammalian and avian telencephalon. Some cortical cell populations, including some of the earliest generated subplate neurons, arrive to the cortex through tangential migration to converge in a specific area where the various cell populations organize themselves into precise neuronal circuits. Comparative analysis of the similarities and variation in these neurogenetic and migration patterns, together with the analysis of gene expression patterns hold the key to reveal conserved, diverged or converged development. A number of recent studies have begun to characterize the chick, mouse, human and non-human primate cortical transcriptome to understand how gene expression relates to the development, anatomical and functional organization of the neocortex. Understanding the molecular and cellular interactions regulating forebrain evolution illuminates the pathomechanisms of several cortical developmental disorders. Denis Burdakov The Francis Krick Institute, UK Brain coordination of instinctive drives Vital instinctive drives, such as eating and sleep, are coordinated by the hypothalamus, one of the most complex and least understood brain regions. These behaviors are often mutually exclusive and need to be coordinated accordingly to avoid disease. The talk will examine how basic indicators of need, such as glucose, change the activity in different types of hypothalamic neurons, and how these neurons perform local computations by interacting with one another. Electrophysiological, optogenetic, and in vivo imaging evidence will be discussed in other to formulate a model of how specific hypothalamic neurons (hypothetical eat, sleep, explore cells) interact to achieve a unity of purpose in behavior. Speakers Suzana Herculano-Houzel Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Humans are special - aren't we? The human brain has long been considered to be an outlier, an exception to the rules of evolution: it is 7 times too large for its body, it consumes 10 times more energy than expected for its mass, it has an enlarged cerebral cortex, and an enlarged prefrontal cortex within it. But does it really? This talk will show evidence of how, once numbers of neurons are considered, the human brain becomes just a large primate brain - although it is made of a remarkable number of neurons in the cerebral cortex equaled in no other species, a feature that can, for the first time, be explained by one cultural development also exclusive to our species: cooking. Tamas Horvath Hypothalamic control of cannabinoid-induced feeding Hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons promote satiety. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is involved in the central regulation of food intake. In my talk I will show that chemical promotion of CB1R activity increases feeding but surprisingly, CB1R activation also promotes neuronal activity of POMC cells while suppressing the activity of AgRP neurons. I will also show the paradoxical increase in POMC activity is crucial for CB1R-induced feeding, because designerreceptors-exclusively-activated-by-designer-drugs (DREADD)-mediated inhibition of POMC neurons diminishes, whereas DREADD-mediated activation of POMC neurons enhances CB1R-driven feeding. The Pomc gene encodes both the anorexigenic peptide α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, and the opioid peptide β-endorphin. CB1R activation selectively increases β-endorphin but not α- melanocyte-stimulating hormone release in the hypothalamus, and systemic or hypothalamic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks acute CB1R- induced feeding. These processes involve mitochondrial adaptations, which, when blocked, abolish CB1R-induced cellular responses and feeding. Together, these results unmask a previously unsuspected role of POMC neurons in the promotion of feeding by cannabinoids. Because we have found that hypothalamic feeding circuits also control other complex behaviors as well, we hypothesize that the overall action of cannabinoids on behavior maybe greatly influenced by hypothalamic POMC neurons. Speakers Luc Pellerin Lausanne University, Switzerland Marcelo O. Dietrich Hunger games: from the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle to food intake regulation Primitive circuits controlling behaviors Brain represents only 2% of the total body weight but it requires an excessively large amount of energy for its function. Glucose has always been considered the main if not exclusive energy substrate for brain cells and it has been assumed that direct neuronal glucose utilization is linearly related to neuronal activity. Over the last twenty years, several evidence have accumulated to challenge this view. A new concept has emerged, termed the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, that proposes a prominent glucose uptake taking place rather in astrocytes and a transfer of lactate to neurons that would use it preferentially as an oxidative energy substrate to satisfy their prominent energy needs. The original model has not only seen its scope enlarged to now include oligodendrocytes in the fueling of axons, but some of its features are key for important physiological functions such as learning and memory or energy homeostasis regulation. In my presentation, I will try to give an overview of the scientific path that led me from an initial narrow interest in astrocyte metabolism to the understanding of more complex neurobiological mechanisms. The nervous system evolved to coordinate flexible goal-directed behaviors by integrating interoceptive and sensory information. Hypothalamic Agrp neurons are known to be crucial for feeding behavior. In my presentation, I will present evidence that these neurons also orchestrate other complex behaviors in adult mice. Activation of Agrp neurons in the absence of food triggers foraging and repetitive behaviors, which are reverted by food consumption. These stereotypic behaviors that are triggered by Agrp neurons are coupled with decreased anxiety. These observations unmask the relevance of primitive brain regions previously associated with homeostasis for complex behaviors beyond eating. These findings are relevant to the understanding of diseases with both homeostatic and compulsive components and highlight the multitasking nature of neurons in the mammalian brain. Rounds of discussion Session 1 Wednesday, April 22 15:45-17:00 Zoltan Molnar Ana Paula Crestani Beatriz Mizusaki Bertha Cristina Bueno Bock Gabriela Godoy Poluceno Helena Biasibetti Jonatas de Paula Oliveira Joselisa Péres Queiroz de Paiva Yasmine Nonose Tamas Horvath André Felipe Rodrigues Claudia Angelica Bonilla Escobar Eduarda Demori Susin Felippe Mousovich Neto Giordano Fabricio Cittolin Santos Denis Burdakov Cristian Figueroa Gabriel Cardozo Müller Gabriela Pandini Silote Rafael de Oliveira Schneider Victor Daniels Vasquez Matsuda Luc Pellerin Andressa Wigner Brochier Bernardo Assein Arús Isabela Santos Valentim Roberta de Paula Martins Roberto Farina Almeida Marcelo Dietrich Aline Haas de Mello Denny Marcel Seccon Isabella Starling Alves Matheus da Rosa Valente Session 2 Thursday, April 23 11:00-12:15 Tamas Horvath Bertha Cristina Bueno Bock Isabela Santos Valentim Isabella Starling Alves Rafael de Oliveira Schneider Roberta de Paula Martins Roberto Farina Almeida Denis Burdakov André Felipe Rodrigues Bernardo Assein Arús Claudia Angelica Bonilla Escobar Denny Marcel Seccon Felippe Mousovich Neto Gabriela Godoy Poluceno Matheus da Rosa Valente Luc Pellerin Aline Haas de Mello Gabriel Cardozo Müller Gabriela Pandini Silote Giordano Fabricio Cittolin Santos Helena Biasibetti Jonatas de Paula Oliveira Yasmine Nonose Marcelo Dietrich Ana Paula Crestani Andressa Wigner Brochier Beatriz Mizusaki Cristian Figueroa Eduarda Demori Susin Joselisa Péres Queiroz de Paiva Victor Daniels Vasquez Matsuda
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