European Journal of Social Education Journal Européen d Education Sociale - PDF

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European Journal of Social Education Journal Européen d Education Sociale A Periodical of FESET / Revue de FESET N 22/ A Periodical of FESET / Revue de FESET N 22/ European

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European Journal of Social Education Journal Européen d Education Sociale A Periodical of FESET / Revue de FESET N 22/ A Periodical of FESET / Revue de FESET N 22/ European Journal of Social Education A periodical of FESET, European Association of Training Centers for Socio-Educational Care Work, International Non Governmental organisation (INGo) enjoying participative status at the Council of Europe. Editorial Board Eeva Timonen-Kallio, Finland (chief editor) Margaret Gilmore, Ireland (co-editor) Christer Cederlund, Sweden François Gillet, Belgium Inge Danielsen, Denmark Jean-Marie Heydt, France Aine de Roiste, Ireland Francois Sentis, France Reidar Osterhaug, Norway The European Journal of Social Education / Journal Européen d Éducation Sociale The FESET Journal is a refereed critical and informative journal concerned with theory, practice and methods in social educational care work and social pedagogy. Authors are invited and encouraged to reflect the diversity of social pedagogical approaches and theoretical thinking to promote innovative socio-educational learning and care work practices. Four regular sections titles in journal are: Focus on research and theoretical perspectives: to reflect the diversity of social pedagogical approaches and theoretical thinking. Focus on teaching and training in social education: to reflect pedagogical methods in the education of social professionals Focus on practice in social professions: to reflect methods and challenges in practice. Book review: Readers contributions of books of interest. Manuscripts for submission should be sent to: Copyright Every part of this publication may be reproduced only by means of integral quotation (author/s, article title, complete references of the revue: title, issue, year, pages). Printed by Tampereen Yliopistopaino Juvenes Print Oy, Tampere, Finland 2012 FESET 2012 ISSN Contents Sommaire Editorial Eeva Timonen-Kallio & Margaret Gilmore 5 Focus on research and theoretical perspectives/ Focus sur la recherche et les perspectives théorique Dolores Angela Castelli Dransart & Barbara Weil Construire ensemble les prémisses d une stratégie nationale suisse de prévention du suicide 10 Arvid Lone Bringing about change a social pedagogic approach: Milieu Pedagogy versus Milieu Therapy 23 Eeva Timonen-Kallio Residential child care work professional knowledge, orientations and methods 37 Focus on teaching and training in social education/ Focus sur l enseignement et la formation en éducation spécialisée Ramona Bernard Case Study and Professional Development in the Education of students at the Child Welfare Program 52 Adrian Staempfli & Regula Kunz & Eva Tov Creating a bridge between theory and practice: working with key situations 60 Kristina Hellberg Pupils with Asperger s syndrome tell about their time in school and their diagnosis 79 Focus on practice in social professions/ Focus sur la pratique dans les professions sociales Inge Danielsen & Gaby Franger Social Work Confronting New Right Wing Movements 100 Poloko Ntshwarang Sexual abuse in school hostels for the san (Basarwa) in Botswana: a gap in child protection 123 Book review/ Livres à vous Saskia Pfleghard Francis Loser: La médiation artistique en travail social. Enjeux et pratiques en atelier d expression et de création 135 Jochen Windheuser Angelika Groterath: Soziale Arbeit in Internationalen Organisationen 137 Creating a bridge between theory and practice: Working with key situations Adi, STAEMPFLI 1 Goldsmiths, University of London, United Kingdom and University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland FHNW, School of Social Work, Olten and Basel, Switzerland Regula, KUNZ Eva, TOV University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland FHNW, School of Social Work, Olten and Basel, Switzerland Abstract This paper describes an innovative approach to integrating theory and practice. Using a co-constructivist perspective, which integrates aspects of Wenger s (1998) Social Theory of Learning such as communities of practice and other reflective practice approaches the authors develop a model of working with key situations. It enables the integration of theory and practice in education and continuing professional development and is based on the understanding that we are used to learning from each other s narratives as a basic human way to pass on knowledge. The learner is guided through a process of reflection, which facilitates the sharing of knowledge across boundaries of Higher Education and practice. It involves theoretical, practical and ethical knowledge which is linked to narratives of situations. These are then assessed on the basis of professional quality standards. Thus, possible best practice, including possible alternative ways to act are developed. 1 Address: Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross, London, SE14 6NW, UK Key words: integration of theory and practice, reflection, communities of practice, key situations 60 EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL EDUCATION N. 22/23_2012 Staempfli & Kunz & Tov Introduction Linking theory and practice is pivotal for professional and academic social work and relevant for social work education and ongoing professional development. The integration of theory and practice can be problematic because the case is not in the book as Schön (1987, p.5) pointedly put it. In an ever changing social world it is essential that professionals are able to adapt emerging knowledge. Practitioners understand a situation by making sense of the relation between abstract knowledge and the specific situation. Social workers need to evaluate this understanding in the light of values and make decisions about what interventions best meet the needs of their clients. Linking theory and practice in such a way is quintessentially a learning process in the context of developing and innovating professional practice. We observe that both students and experienced practitioners find it difficult to link theory and practice. The discussion on the professionalisation of social work over the last two decades has focussed on the division of scientific knowledge and professional practice (Moch, 2006; von Spiegel, 2006; Sommerfeld, 2004). Nevertheless, scientific and professional communities have repeated calls for professional social work (...) to be based on science (Gredig, 2011, 54). In this paper we will address the following questions: How can students and practitioners best link theory and practice and how can they be supported in this process? We will discuss current literature and research findings on linking theory and practice;then present our model of working with key situations which we will discuss, focussing on theories underpinning the model. Bridging the gap revisited Evidence-based practice(ebp) is the most commonly associated model with linking theory and practice. It is founded on the technical-rational model of scienceand is associated with the risk paradigm (D Cruz et al. 2009).EBPhas been adopted for professional and academic social work (Gray et al. 2009),althoughit continues to be controversial. Hüttemann& Sommerfeld (2008) point to varying epistemological foundations and interpretations of EBP. Maynard (2009) raises the issue that research on implementation of the modelis in its infancy and is riddled with inconsistent use of defi- N. 22/23_2012 JOURNAL EUROPÉEN D EDUCATION SOCIALE 61 nitions (Maynard, 2009,p.304).Publication alone, even when suitable access is provided, does not lead to its use in practice (Gray et al. 2009), neither does standardised implementation of evidence in organisational procedures(trevillion, 2008). Guidelines do little to change practice (Gray et al. 2009).In addition, the implementation of guidelines has led to an association of EBP with bureaucratisation and proceduralisation (Munro, 2011). The over-emphasis on quantitative research leaves little room for professional experience and judgements(munro 2011, Nevo & Slonim-Nevo 2011)and ignores the reality that social work is a process based on relationships (Collingwood, et al., 2008). More fundamental epistemological questions with regard to EBP are also posed. The rational decision-making model is fraught with difficulties because rational thinking has been shown to be influenced by a number of biases (Kahneman, 2011; Gray et al., 2009; Trevithick, 2008).Indeed the wealth of cognitive science research suggests that the complex decision-making environment (Gray et al. 2009, p. 158) of social work needs to be considered in relation to EBP.Another central criticism of EBP is that social work interventions take place in situations that are unique and uncertain and are therefore not open to the type of scientific enquiry normally associated with more positivistic, measurement-based understandings of practice (Wilson, 2011, p. 3). Therefore a fit between a model of rational choice and the realities of social work practice is inadequate (...) (van de Luitgaarden, 2009). While there continues to be a debate about EBP, the need to integrate scientific knowledge and practice remains undisputed. As a way forward D Cruz et al. (2009) suggest a dualist approach that allows engagement with a material reality, while also recognizing the multiple (and relative) meanings possible for these material realities (D Cruz et al., 2009, p. 82). In this way professionals can interpret specific situations using all available sources of knowledge, including scientific knowledge. They do this in order to understand andweigh up specific and generalisable aspects of the situation. Therefore, in our model we include all knowledge domains which are relevant to professional social work practice situations as depicted in figure EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL EDUCATION N. 22/23_2012 in order to understand andweigh up specific and generalisable aspects of the situation. Therefore, in our model we include all knowledge domains which are relevant to professional peer social reviewed work practice situations as depicted in figure Staempfli 1. & Kunz & Tov Figure 1. Knowledge domains in social work situations (author s illustration). Figure 1 Knowledge domains in social work situations (author s illustration) Trevithick (2008, p.1216) asserts that the different forms of knowledge ( ) are not in conflict but Trevithick need (2008, to be viewed p.1216) asserts complementing that the different each forms other. of knowledge Kaiser (2005) ( ) are refers to the different not in domains conflict but fittingly need to as be resources. viewed as complementing Gray & Schubert each other. (2010) Kaiser argue (2005) that linking theory and practice is most effective when all these resources are combined. refers to the different domains fittingly as resources. Gray & Schubert (2010) argue that linking theory and practice is most effective when all these resources are The challenge of linking theory and practice affectsboth novices and experts, but in different combined. ways (Kaiser, 2005; Dreyfus & Dreyfus, 1987).Newcomers need to internalise The knowledge challenge of while linking old-timers theory and practice need to affectsboth externalise novices it. and This experts, may be why practice educators feel out of touch with science, while beingwilling to engage with but in different ways (Kaiser, 2005; Dreyfus & Dreyfus, 1987).Newcomers need research(clapton et al., 2006).Another reason may be, that adirect transfer of to internalise knowledge while old-timers need to externalise it. This may be scientific knowledge into practice and experiential knowledge is not possible(sommerfeld why practice educators 2000), feel only out a of transformation.kaiser touch with science, while beingwilling (2005) describes to engage with paths: research(clapton firstly, from et explicit al., 2006).Another to situated reason knowledge may be, (novices that adirect in a subject three transformation area), secondly, transfer of from scientific situation knowledge to into situation practice (experienced and experiential practitioners), knowledge is not and lastly, from situation possible(sommerfeld via explicit knowledge 2000), only a to transformation.kaiser situated knowledge. (2005) The describes latter three is useful to reflect on transformation experienced paths: situation, firstly, from or explicit if an to upcoming situated knowledge situation (novices is so unfamiliar, in a subject area), from secondly, a known from situation is to not situation possible. (experienced Consequently, practitioners), evidence and based that a direct transfer practice lastly, needs from to be situation combined via explicit with knowledge reflexivity. to If situated not, social knowledge. work is The more latter likely is to fail than to produce useful to reflect best practice on an experienced (Schnurr, situation, 2005). or if an upcoming situation is so unfamiliar, that a direct transfer from a known situation is not possible. Consequently, Hence,reflective practice is seen as the idealway to link theory and practice.but while reflection is accepted as being the key to professional practice, the concept of reflection remains ill defined (Wilson, 2011; Jennert, 2008; D'Cruz et al., 2007; Lam et al. 2007) and there is a lack of comprehensive heuristic models for reflection N. 22/23_2012 JOURNAL EUROPÉEN D EDUCATION SOCIALE 63 evidence based practice needs to be combined with reflexivity. If not, social work is more likely to fail than to produce best practice (Schnurr, 2005). Hence,reflective practice is seen as the idealway to link theory and practice.but while reflection is accepted as being the key to professional practice, the concept of reflection remains ill defined (Wilson, 2011; Jennert, 2008; D Cruz et al., 2007; Lam et al. 2007) and there is a lack of comprehensive heuristic models for reflection (Jennert, 2008). The literature on reflective practice suggests that reflection needs to include thinking about best available evidence (Knott & Scragg, 2007; Fook & Gardner, 2007; Knecht, 2005), practice (Gray & Schubert 2010; Schön, 1987; Kolb, 1983), emotions (Fook & Gardner, 2007; Knott & Scragg, 2007), learning strategies (Jennert, 2008) and always lead to action (Payne, 2009; Beverley & Worsley, 2007; Fook & Gardner, 2007). Thus, linking theory and practice is a complex business and remains challengingnot just for novices in education but also for expert professionals and academics. Applying new knowledge in practice is associated with understanding a practice situation, identifying and judging new external knowledge resources, combining principles with experience, designing solutions and applying them to new situations or aligning them with past experiences and lastly, with critically monitoring the strategy used and outcomes achieved (Brown & Rutter, 2010). It is best supported by heuristic reflection models, which help students, professionals and scientists to integrate different forms of knowledge and practice. We suggest that working with key situations is such an innovative model that fulfils these requirements. A presentation of the model of working with key situations now follows, which describes step by step the process involved. We also explain why these processes are important from a didactical perspective, therefore showing how the model enables students and practitioners to link theory and practice. Key situations in social work The roots of the model lie in the work undertaken by Kunz & Tov (2009). They applied a modified developing a curriculum (DACUM)procedure (Tippelt & Edlemann, 2007). A project team consisting of social work practitioners and lecturers analysed the fields of social work and social pedagogy and produced a collection of professional key situations. The resulting 130 situations describe the typical activities that social workers need to be able to manage overall. The developed situa- 64 EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL EDUCATION N. 22/23_2012 Staempfli & Kunz & Tov tions were structured along the adapted and extendedcategories of Kaisers (2005) integrated learning model. The term key situation was chosen in reference to key competency and key role.while most forms of case reflections focus on a client or a client system over a certain period, whereas the focus with key situations shifts to the participating actors within a social or organisational context and with a limited time frame. It involves just the moment in which professionals and service users have to master a specific challenge. The situations from the collection are now used in practice-theory transformation seminars. They take place parallel to the practice learning experience and stretch over the course of 10 weeks. Students work in groups of about three, because this has been shown to support students learning (Simpson et al. 2010) and to enable the social negotiation of meaning (Reusser, 2006). Students work with one chosen key situation, which is based ona situationfrom practice learning.starting with experiences is valued by students (Sieminski&Seden, 2011; Simpson et al. 2010) and at the same time values students experiences (Noble 2001). This situation is then deconstructed by describing the narrative of the situation with a focus on the actions of the participants.using narration has been shown to be able to raise complex experiences and placement issues (Noble 2001). Evidence from research on expertise (Gruber &Rehrl, 2003) and cognitive science (Kahneman, 2011) demonstrates that human decision making and behaviour is strongly influenced by stories. But in order to reflect on the implicit hidden in these narratives, it is important to explicateit (Fisher & Somerton, 2000).That is why the narrative of the situation is then divided into sequences and the situations are re-enactedin role play. Thereby, the students are enabled to bring the inner dialogue of the social worker (thinking) and the emotions of both social worker and clientto the surface. This reflection-in-action (Schön, 1983) is added to the description. Then the typical characteristics of these kinds of situations aredetermined. This forces the students to think about the general and the specific aspects of the situation. It is a first step towards thinking about theories in relation to the situation. By examining the reflection-in-action, the students then reconstruct the implicit knowledge in the thinking of the social worker. This is then linked with appropriate scientific knowledge, helping toexplicate the tacit. In addition, students are encouraged to investigate further relevant knowledge by posing questions such as Why did the young person in the situation not want to...? or What models of counsel- N. 22/23_2012 JOURNAL EUROPÉEN D EDUCATION SOCIALE 65 ling would help in such a situation? thus aiming to explain the situation and the behaviour of the people from a theoretical view.thus, our model of learning is selfdirected (Reusser, 2006) and is loosely following aninquiry and problem based approach. This has been seen to be helpful (Pack, 2010; Reusser, 2006).The other resources are also put in writing and added to the whole account. Following the definition of the quality standards, the students are asked to evaluate their situation and describe alternative interventions. Through the integration of quality standards based on ethical knowledge and values, we enable ethical discourse, whichis central to social work practice (IFSW and IASSW, 2004, cited in: Whebi&Straka, 2011). Throughout this process the students are coached by a lecturer who provides inputs and feedback. They are given a reader to increase their understanding of the model. Support by lecturers has been shown to enhance students learning (Simpson et al. 2010) and lecturers are able to use strategies to build confidence (Sieminski&Seden, 2011). This is also important when working with situations that contain critical incidents that can trigger uncertainties and anxieties. Educators
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